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Click The Name of Knots to View Details:

 

 

Alberto Knot

 

 

Palomar Knot

 

 

Snell Knot

 

 

Improved Clinch Knot

 

 

Trilene Knot

 

 

Arbor Knot

 

 

Australian Braid Knot

 

 

Blood Knot

 

 

Dropper Loop Knot

 

 

Duncan (Uni) Knot

 

 

Egg Loop Knot

 

 

Nail Knot

 

 

Non-Slip Mono Knot

 

 

Orvis Knot

 

 

Perfection (Angler's) Loop Knot

 

 

Rapala Knot

 

 

San Diego Jam (Reverse Clinch) Knot

 

 

Slim Beauty Knot

 

 

Surgeon's Knot

 

 

Surgeon's Loop Knot

 

 

Alberto Knot

The Modified Albright Knot is also known as the Alberto Knot. It is a terrific  knot for joining different diameter (thickness) leaders made of monofilament, fluorocarbon or copolymer to braided fishing line. 

The Aberto Knot will work with any braid line. However, if you are tying a leader to braided fishing line with a waxy coating, first pull the line between your thumbnail and forefinger to remove the coating.

Alberto Knie, who is also known as “Crazy Alberto” says, "Since the inception of the super lines there was no real mono to braid knots. And those common knots everyone recommended just didn’t cut it! I actually tried many recommended knots until I came up with this knot and I’ve been using ever since. I have a few friends (and some friends who are world record holders) who love it and will not go back. In fact, it is being well received throughout the world and I am glad everyone is enjoying it."

Albright Knot Details

Uses: The Alberto  Knot is a valuable knot that has a wide range of uses. It works for joining different types of fishing line like monofilament, fluorocarbon or copolymer to braided fishing line.

Advantages: The Alberto Knot will easily slide through your guides when casting.

Video:

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Palomar Knot

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The Palomar Knot is a great knot to know, especially if you are using braided fishing line.  If you tie the Palomar correctly it comes close to having 100% test strength. When the hook or lure is passed through the loop, make certain that all parts of the knot cinch up together. Some drawings and instruction for the Palomar knot make it appear as if the loop part of the knot goes up against the bottom of the eye of the hook or lure. If tied like that, the knot can fail.  The Palomar Knot is the best knot to use with braided fishing line and can be used in many different situations when tying directly to a hook.

Palomar Knot Details

Uses: This knot is good for all kinds of light fishing lines including monofilament and copolymer, and especially braided lines. It retains almost 100% of the original line strength, even when using monofilament line.  Of all fishing knots the Palomar is regarded as one of the strongest and most reliable, it is easy to tie, and when tied correctly it is nearly impossible to pull out.

Advantages: It is recommended for use with braided lines, which can slip with other knots. With a little practice the Palomar is a knot that can be tied with your eyes closed.

Video:

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Snell Knot

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The Snell Knot provides a reliable straight-line pull when setting the hook. 

Snell Knot Details

Uses: The Snell Knot allows the leader to be directly tied to a baited hook. It was originally invented for use with eyeless hooks but it is still widely used today. It aligns the fishing line or leader with the shank of the hook.

Advantages: The Snell Knot is one of the older knots and is claimed to provide a reliable connection that preserves the strength of the line – particularly if the thickness of the eye is greater than the line diameter.

Video: 

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Improved Clinch Knot

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Improved Clinch Knot Details

Uses: The Improved Clinch knot is one of the most widely used fishing knots. It provides a good method of securing a fishing line to a hook, lure, or swivel. The "improved" version shown here includes an extra tuck under the final turn (step 9). It is commonly used to fasten the leader to the fly. Because it is harder to tie in heavier lines it is not recommended if you are using over 30 lb test line.

Advantages: The Improved Clinch knot is regarded as a fisherman's reliable standby. It is particularly suited for attaching a small diameter tippet to a heavy wire hook. The extra final tuck improves your chances of holding a strong fish.

Video: 

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Trilene Knot

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Trilene Knot Details

Uses: The Trilene Knot is a strong and reliable knot to join monofilament line to hooks, swivels and lures. It resists slippage and failures and is an excellent and stronger alternative to the Clinch Knot.

Advantages: The double wrap of line through the eye takes some of the strain and may be responsible for claims that this knot retains a high proportion of ideal line strength. This is more likely when the thickness of the eye is greater than the line diameter.

Video: 

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Arbor Knot

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Arbor Knot Details

Uses: The Arbor Knot is used to attach the fishing line to the "Arbor" or "Spool Center". In fact the Arbor Knot is really based on a noose knot and, therefore, pulling tightens it.

Advantages: The Arbor knot is simple, easily learned and effective.

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Australian Braid Knot

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Australian Braid Knot Details

Uses: The Australian Braid (or Plait) is an alternative to the Bimini Twist and creates a strong loop for use as a double-line leader on the end of a fishing line which can then be used for a loop-to-loop connection.

Advantages: This braid transfers the strain gradually to the knot over a considerable length. Although it is not nearly so well known as the Bimini Twist, its supporters claim it is easier to learn and quicker to tie. It also presents the smallest diameter. As few men are used to braiding, if you are a male reader and have a daughter, try and persuade her to make the braids for you.

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Blood Knot

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Blood Knot Details

Uses: The Blood Knot is a favorite knot for fly fisherman. It is primarily used to join two lines of similar size, e.g., when joining sections of leader or tippet, and is one of the best knots for this purpose. The strength of the knot depends on making at least five, and up to seven, turns on each side of the center.

Advantages: The Blood knot is a simple, easily learned and very effective way of joining two similar sized lines.

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Dropper Loop Knot

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Dropper Loop Details

Uses: The Dropper Loop creates a loop that stands out at right angles to the middle of a length of line. It can be used in your leader or tippet to provide an extra attachment point for an additional fly. If desired the loop can be made long enough to set a hook directly on it. However, to minimize the risk of fouling and twisting this Dropper loop should not be too long. The Dropper knot is also used on multi-hook fishing lines.

Advantages: The Dropper Loop angles away from the line which helps to avoid tangles.

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Duncan (Uni) Knot

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Duncan (Uni) Knot Details

Uses: As described by Vic Dunaway it is the key component of his Uni Knot System – which can provide all of the applications needed for fishing with a single knot. To join two lines a Uni-knot is tied around the other line. For Snelling, the knot is tied around the shank of the hook.

Advantages: The Duncan Knot works well with both braided and monofilament fishing lines, and with practice is fairly easy to tie in the dark. Claims that it retains a high proportion of line strength have been justified by recent testing arranged by Mack Martin that showed 82% of line strength. When tied a round a large diameter eye, it may retain strength well, but if used to join two lines, like other knots where a line passes around itself, a breaking strain around 75% is more likely.

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Egg Loop Knot

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Egg Loop Knot Details

Uses: Fish eggs, shrimp, and fish roe make excellent bait. The Egg Loop knot provides a hold for the bait and is commonly used when fishing for salmon and steelhead trout.

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Nail Knot

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Nail Knot Details

Uses: The Nail Knot was originally named because a nail was inserted as a guide when threading the line. Today, it is easier to use a small straw if you can. The Nail Knot is an important fishing knot used to join two lines of different diameters and allows for line diameters to diminish down to the fly, i.e., it is useful for attaching your backing to the fly line, and your fly line to the leader, or tippet.

Advantages: The Nail Knot makes a smooth compact knot that will readily pass through the guides.

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Non-Slip Mono Knot

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Non-Slip Mono Knot Details

Uses:The Non-Slip Mono makes a very strong fixed loop in the end of the line. Because the loop doesn't grip the lure, it makes a flexible attachment and allows a more natural action.

Advantages: The Non-Slip Mono is fairly easy to tie. Lefty Kreh discovered that the knot retains most of the line's rated strength - so much so that in some of his tests the strand broke rather than the knot. Another advantage is that the tag end faces the hook.

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Orvis Knot

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Orvis Knot Details

Uses: The Orvis Knot was invented by Larry Becker who submitted it in a contest held by the Orvis Company to find the best knot to attach a line to the hook.

Advantages: The Orvis knot is strong, small, light, reliable, and easily to remember and tie. It also works well in light and heavy lines and in any tippet material.

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Perfection (Angler's) Loop Knot

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Perfection (Angler's) Loop Details

Uses: The Perfection Loop was described by Ashley as the Angler's Loop (ABOK # 1017, p 188.) It is the easiest way to make a small loop in the end of a leader or tippet that will lie perfectly in line with the standing end. It is commonly used to join a Perfection Loop in the end of a fly line to a Perfection loop in a Leader using a "Loop to Loop" connection.

Advantages: The Perfection loop creates a stable loop that lines up neatly with the standing end. Using a "Loop to Loop" connection the Perfection Knot allows for quick and convenient leader changes.

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Rapala Knot

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Rapala Knot Details

Uses: The Rapala Knot is a non-slip loop knot usually tied directly to the lure. The Rapala brothers recommended it for use with their Rapala lures as providing a loop that allowed the lures to move freely and naturally. If a swivel or leader is essential, it is best to choose the lightest tackle possible to allow the lure to move with a natural motion.

Advantages: The advantage claimed for this knot is that it allows the lure to move naturally. It is also claimed to retain most of the line strength - and this might be expected as the structure of the knot passes the force to the loop via a wrap in the center.

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San Diego Jam (Reverse Clinch) Knot

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San Diego Jam (Reverse Clinch) Knot Details

Uses: The San Diego Jam Knot is also known as the Reverse Clinch Knot and as the Heiliger Knot. It was popularized in San Diego particularly with long-range tuna fisherman. It is reasonably easy to tie at sea and is suitable for monofilament, braided, and fluorocarbon lines.

Advantages: It is relatively easy to learn and to tie – even in adverse conditions.

Video:

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Slim Beauty Knot

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Slim Beauty Knot Details

Uses: The Slim Beauty is an excellent knot for joining different diameters and different materials. As shown in the animation, it is excellent when tying a large Tippet to the Main Line. Tarpon fishermen use it because it is strong and easy to tie and many people us it as a more convenient alternative to a Bimini Twist.

Advantages: The Slim Beauty is used to join braided to mono as well as small diameters to large diameters. It is a versatile knot which is relatively easy to learn and remember. It is also compact and straight when completed.

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Surgeon's Knot

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Surgeon's Knot Details

Uses: The Surgeon's Knot, or Surgeon's Join, is easy to tie and is useful to join two lines of moderately unequal size, e.g., a tippet to a leader. It is actually tied as a Double Overhand Knot - which probably explains why it is sometimes known as the Double Surgeon's Knot - redundant because "Surgeon's" implies the use of the two turns. The Surgeon's Knot allows you, with the same leader, to select the size of tippet to suit the size of the fly. It is usually used to join two pieces of monofilament.

Advantages: The Surgeon's Knot is one of the easiest knots to learn and is an excellent knot to join two lines of moderately unequal size.

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Surgeon's Loop Knot

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Surgeon's Loop Knot Details

Uses: The Surgeon's Loop is essentially a Double Overhand Knot. It can be tied quickly and easily in the end of a line. It is often used to make a "Loop to Loop" connection in the same way that two elastic bands can be hooked into each other. It can also create a fixed loop that allows the artificial lure or fly to move naturally.

Advantages: The advantage for this knot is that is reliable, easy to learn, and some sources claim that it retains a high proportion of the rated line strength.

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